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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> an unprecedented tragedy in santa cruz. two veteran police officers shot to death. they are the city's first officers to be killed in the line of duty. we have team coverage. ktvu's janine de la vega is learning more about the officers and getting community reaction. but we begin with tara moriarty with new information on the shooting and the suspect. tara? >> reporter: we understand the suspect lived a couple of houses down the street. behind me is actually doyle street. police say after the suspect killed two officers over on branciforte drive, he came here and it appears he was shot in front of this garage. now, there were too many bullet holes to count. several garages are strung together in this complex and at least half of them were riddled with holes, chunks of one door even missing. we also spotted bullet holes on a nearby van. two cars were towed earlier this morning from the scene. one of them had two bullet holes through the front windshield. loren baker and elizabeth butler were both killed during a confrontation yesterday afternoon about a mile from the beach on branciforte aven
and brash mayor, and the people of new york city loved him. we'll tell you about that, straight ahead. christine. >>> and the first jobs report of 2013 released in an hour and a half. the numbers for you, what it means for the health of the economy and the jobs market. >> and the defense secretary nominee on the defensive. chuck hagel grilled on capitol hill. did he blow his shot to convince lawmakers that he's the right man for the job? >> friday, february 1st, and "starting point" begins right now. >>> welcome, everybody. breaking news, we start with. two people have died, several people wounded in explosion that has taken place outside the u.s. embassy in ankara, turkey. chris lawrence joins us from the pentagon. >> reporter: good morning, soledad. not much information right now. turkey authorities are responding to that scene, trying to collect more information. the blast happened just a short while ago, some. news reports out of that area, saw a big flash, heard a big bang. reports of several people wounded near a side gate of the embassy. we're waiting for more information, the
city mayor ed koch has died. he passed away from congestive heart failure. he had really problems with his health over the last many years. mayor koch elected in 1977. he was a judge on the people's court, and he had been hospitalized recent well fluid on his lungs. moved to intensive care yesterday. he was 88 years old. richard socaridies joins us. writer for "new yorker," former aide to president clinton. when i was a kid growing up in long island, mayor koch was almost a mythical figure. >> larger than life. when i grew up in manhattan, he was mayor, and as you said, he was very feisty, said what he thought. new yorkers loved him. he gave new york some tough love. he would say whatever he thought, famous for savering a city from bankruptcy. but also governing at very challenging times, beginning of the aids crisis. a locality of racial tension and diversity. issues of racial tension and diversity in new york. he served during very challenging times, took very controversial positions, no one questioned he loved the city and a fighter for new york always. >> his personality itsel
near the northern city of aleppo. they say they've captured fighter jets and a large number of weapons. they say some of the planes appear to be in working order. rebels seized syria's largest dam on monday. they've been launching attacks on aleppo's international airport. government troops have responded with air strikes on aleppo and the capital damascus. opposition activists say more than 50 people died in the latest fighting. >>> a man has attacked people in the u.s. pacific territory of guam with a knife. local police say he killed two people and he wounded at least 12 other people, 11 of them japanese. the man reportedly slammed his car into a shop in the busy tourist district of tumon. then he started attacking people. hospital officials say the two dead were japanese women. they say the wounded include an 8-month-old baby and a 3-year-old child. fire officials say three people died. police say they've detained a 21-year-old american resident of guam. >>> japanese exporters and stock investors have seen the decline of the yen and have cheered it on, but today they're seeing a di
of dale city. slow newington to the beltway. across the 14th street bridge, allow extra time here, delays slowing at the beltway headed north to the potomac. that's a check of your fox 5 on- time traffic. >>> thanks, julie. we are following breaking news from overseas from turkey of an explosion at the american embassy. we're showing you live coverage from turkish tv from the scene. the video shows ambulances and emergency vehicles near the embassy. a turkish police official says a suicide bomber blew up explosions and two were killed. reports of several injuries. again, an explosion near the u.s. embassy in the capital of turkey. we'll bring you pdates as soon as we get them. >>> more breaking news now, this time from new york city. that is where former mayor ed koch has died from congestive heart failure. he had been in and out of the hospital throughout month of january, suffering from fluid in his lungs and legs. he was readmitted monday with shortness of breath. but doctors moved him into intensive care yesterday. koch served for three terms from 1978 through 1989, and is credited wi
to be swift, heavy and dangerous. >> stay off the streets of our city. basically, stay home. >> reporter: the storm already struck the midwest, blanketing chicago with snow and leaving cars in ditches in wisconsin. along the densely i-95 corridor from new york, boston and beyond, preparations are under way. crews across the region loaded up salt trucks and are ready to hit the road. >> it will probably be a long four days, which is tough on anybody. >> reporter: no doubt, there is a lot of work ahead. new york has 6,300 miles of streets to plow. >> we have more than 250,000 tons of salt on-hand. >> reporter: in new jersey, residents brace for the storm, even though they haven't recovered from the devastation left behind by superstorm sandy. >> trying to batten down the hatches here, if any storms are coming. the last one ruined us totally. >> reporter: new england residents rushed out to stock up on essentials. >> this is panic shopping. so, bread, milk, a snow shovel in case our snow shovel breaks. >> reporter: the fire department was even called into a supermarket in salem, massachuset
morning, elizabeth and to you, george. muff kn much news to get to. former new york city mayer ed koch has died. he was the face of the city in the '80s. known worldwide for a feisty style and helping to rescue new york from financial ruin. he died this morning, he was 88 years old. >>> we want to turn to the price of gas, about to set a record for this time of the year. numbers out this morning show prices have risen 13 cents in the last two weeks. the national average, $3.46 per gallon. you can blame a slowdown at refineries and the rising cost of crude oil. >>> the first may jr. read on how the economy is faring thus far. 165,000 jobs were created in january is what is expected to be reported today. the unemployment rate stands at 7.8%. >>> $30,000 reward is being offered following the brazen murder of an assistant district attorney near dallas. mark hasse was shot five times while walking into court. investigators believe he may have been targeted for investigating the aryan brotherhood. >>> massive explosion at the head quarters of mexico's state run oil agency in mexico city. 25 peo
event south of new york city. we have the rain-snow line. so that might cut back a little bit of the snow totals here in new york but we're still expecting close to a foot or more in new york city. north and west of the city that's where we're getting the snowe. ongoing snow for 12 to even 18 hours with relentless wind. this is a very, very powerful storm overnight tonight. so throughout the day today, things will start to deteriorate. the worst conditions overnight tonight, into tomorrow. we'll see power outages along the east coast most certainly with winds, 30, 40, 50 miles an hour. in some cases hurricane-force winds. we have a hurricane-force bind advisories all along the coast. snow pounds new england. some areas around boston, alisyn, over three feet. which would be historic for them. alisyn: i'm putting on my parka right now. >> the good side it is happening this weekend, all the kids are going. they're excited. alisyn: schools are closing in connecticut. >> we want people to be safe. alisyn: absolutely. thanks for the update. we'll check back in? >> okay. rick: well f
, etc. if every city and mitropoulos got hit hard on home building and retail and began to look up there traded sectors and began to look at the advance manufacturing sectors and basically would say, what do they need to survive and prosper? and do we have a skills problem? do we have an infrastructure problem? do we have an innovation break down, essentially between research and development, a prototype, development? this will basically follow the health of the cluster and particularly with small and medium-sized firms, what are they doing to essentially help lee is relatively small firms? -- help these small firms.?? >> john, said a funny thing. you said no matter how much the government screws up, caltech will still be caltech and m.i.t. will still be m.i.t. outside the beltway, it is a different reality and you talked about public and private partnerships at the local level. can you talk about why they are so important and maybe share your story about how you see the power partnerships? >> i did not mind it versus the real world. i spend most of my time with the company's seen
city, a rematch of last year's nba finals. thunder trying to prove they can beat lebron and the heat. they did nothing of the sort last night. didn't start well for durant. doesn't get the call. draws a technical for pounding the floor. later in the first, scary moment for durant and the thunder. he goes for the rebound, falls and slams his shoulder. they don't want to see that. he did stay down but refused to leave the game and scored 40 points. i guess he's okay. fourth quarter, lebron looking to keep his record going of scoring over 30 points. with a field goal percentage of 60% or higher. he sinks the deep three, gives the heat a 15-point lead. later in the quarter he elevates, throws down the alley-oop. heat win. lebron with another big night, he shot 39 but shot a mere 58%. his historic streak is over, but the heat are cruising and lebron playing out of his mind. >>> kevin youkilis not endearing himself to his fan base. he played for the red sox for eight years. he showed up for his first day of spring training with the yankees and told reporters, quote, i will always be a red
of defense when you look and say in a benghazi or, you know, i don't want to go city by city for obvious security reasons. when you look at them, how often do you determine we'll take a look this week and see where with e are security wise. i know, state is a big part. >> the best thing we did is state asked us to join a team that would look at security at 19 embassies and determine what was needed there in order to better secure those facilities. and i think based on that, it gives us the opportunity to then demy additional -- additional marine if we have to take additional steps to make sure that those embassies are not vulnerable. so we do work with the state department when asked to try to help provide some guidance with regards to security. >> how often is a review done in some of these places, for instance, a benghazi. do they -- is it on a -- when the ambassador says, things are getting tougher, or every couple of weeks is it looked as it is deor ituated or gotten better. what kind of matrix is used? >> well, you know, look. the primary -- the primary matrix for that has to rest w
of thoughtfulness that needs to happen, rather than arbitrary cuts. host: a lot more stories about your largest city, detroit, and its economic issues. what is the future of that city? guest: detroit has many great things going on, young people moving in, some great projects going on. the challenge in detroit is city government. it is not a recent issue. there are good people in the recent administration. this goes back for decades. the city government is unsustainable in terms of its finances. it needs to provide better services. we have had a review team looking at the finances. one of the question it asks is, do we need to take additional steps to get detroit's finances together? -- working better? oddly partner with the city to get that happening? detroit will be a great city again. that is critically important for the future of michigan. caller: what is happening in detroit is disgraceful. look. you run for office. you get in, you get that power, and all good ideas run out of your mind. it seems like all of the government, including state, is bought and sold to the highest bidder. you start off
leavy in oklahoma city and public service as a u.s. magistrate in the western district of oklahoma. as evidence of his career and distinction, when judge bacharach was chosen to be a magistrate judge from a pool of many well-qualified candidates, the chief judge characterized the decision as an easy one. since that time, his colleagues have characterized his service as remarkable, demonstrating superb judicial temperament and a real asset to the western district family and the legal community. as with any position in the judicial branch that comes with a lifetime appointment, the senate must deliberate carefully, and we did and gave all the thought to this nominee, and as was shown and clearly demonstrated by a unanimous vote of confirmation. you don't see this very often but you saw it with judge bacharach. so i appreciate the opportunity to support him today and to have been able to call and be the first to congratulate him in this new part of his career, which we will be very, very proud and i can assure the chair and all the rest of them that this is a guy that we will always b
, the city offers its largest reward ever for the man accused of killing three. in his online manifesto, dorner threaten to wage and conventional and asymmetrical warfare against the police department he accused of racism and corruption. the united states ratchets up this economic war against iran ahead of this month's nuclear talks. >> i want to underscore to iran, the window for diplomacy is still open and we have agreed to meet iran again in two weeks. we have made our position clear. the choice is really up to iran. >> will speak with president of the national iranian american council. and historian on the largest and unconventional life of misses paul robeson. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the vatican has announced pope an addict will step down as head of the catholic church later this month. it's a surprise move makes benedict the first pontiff to resign in nearly six centuries his policy has been marked by a range of issues and a number of child molestation scandal and the catholic church including allegations he ignored at
of the very practices under shaken by the city units that you once operated. for example, as treasury secretary he would be responsible for coordinating implementation of the so-called looker rules, which is intended to separate proprietary trading from the federally insured financial activities. you stated that you support the rule, and yet you were the chief operating officer for the units engaged in the sort of the activities the rule was meant to prevent. therefore if you were to be confirmed it could lead to an awkward situation in which your role as the chair of the fsoc from tester of the fsoc coming to effectively saying to the financial firms do as i say, not as i did. now these are not trivial matters. indeed, they bear directly on your qualifications to serve as the next treasury secretary. if the committee was given time to examine the record more thoroughly before today's hearing, i'm sure many of the questions that have already been answered. we have to explore some of these matters here today. finally, i just want to mention that when we met the nomination i told you th
because it happened very quickly without a single fire shot. we know what happened next. out into the city they went. this is where it gets quite fascinating. once they came out of the airport, somewhere down around here, look at all of the art rarelies that they could have gone to. if you think about it, just driving 30 miles per hour in five minutes they could have been beyond that radius in almost any direction, wolf. it's been an extraordinary story of how they were organized, the whole thing from beginning to end took about 11 minutes and then they were gone without a trace. they found a burned out vehicle that they think is connected to this but they don't know if it was the direction they went or anything else. the bottom line is, the diamonds are gone. if you want a sense of what $50 million in diamonds looks like, take a look at this. this bag has half a million small diamonds in it. if you want to have $50 million worth of diamonds, what you have to have is that many bags full of diamonds like that. so it's an extraordinary robbery but getting rid of it, wolf, will be the real ch
, in some of the larger cities and then some smaller independent operators in smaller cities. a good part of the traffic has been people who stream it online. that is pretty dedicated following. in fact, with the very large online content it was 40% of that comes from the united states. >> host: so that is the appetite? >> guest: there is appetite clearly. online streamers. >>ing are fresh should have content to have people cross over. >> al-jazeera purchased current tv in december last year. just month 1/2 ago. how about expanding the american audience. who will you reach right now? >> potentially estimated 50 million viewers. if you talk going 4 1/2 million homes to 50 million homes, obviously a great leap forrd -- forward. one of the things we fought for years was distribution in the meshes. this opens some eyeballs to us and we hope we'll give people a chance to see our coverage, to sample it from those that haven't seen it and provide another platform for the core audience that we already have. >> here are some facts about al-jazeera english channel. it is a 24 hour global news netwo
students across this country and in the city of chicago walk out and they see the promise of downtown, do they see their future as part of that opportunity or do they see a different future? and that is how we measure success. the two places where we can bridge that gap between where our kids are today and the promise of this city and the promise that this city holds are in the classroom and in the home. president obama understands that to connect all americans to that vision of a promising future requires that we create real ladders of opportunity. i am pleased he has come home to expand on that vision. ladies and gentlemen, let's give the president a chicago welcome. [playing "hail to the chief"] [applause] >> hey, chicago. hello, chicago. hello, everybody. hello, hyde park. [cheers] it is good to be home. it is good to be home. everybody have a seat, y'all relax. it's just me. y'all know me. it is good to be back home. a couple of people i want to acknowledge -- first of all, i want to thank your mayor, my great friend rahm emanuel for his outstanding leadership of the city and this ki
advantage of it, without unduly exposing it to our adversaries. let me move on to private city and civil liberties. anytime you're talking about sharing the information, sharing information with respect to cybersecurity, you have to be conscious of privacy and civil liberties and you have to make sure those are protected. that has been a priority of the administration and it continues to be so. so, while there are perhaps fewer concerns in the executive order because the focus is on sharing information outward, we have established a robust, oversight regime and in particular we have highlighted the fips. that is the government speak, right? if i don't insert an acronym every two or three minutes it is just not fun. the fips are the fair information practice principles. these date back to the 1970's when they were developed dealing with health records. essentially it is what are the principles you need to use in considering privacy with respect to information? so we think it's important we establish these as a one of the principles that we're going to follow with respect to sharing inform
bureaucracy can afford to bear the brunt of these cuts, not our military, not communities like lake city or mayo or newberry or middleberg, florida. i'm working with my friend from georgia, congressman doug collins, on the new freshmen regulatory reform working group, to help show exactly where some of these cuts are and help businesses do what they do best, they grow the economy and they create jobs, bringing in more revenues to our government. we need and we will show the president and the american people that we can cut wasteful spending without hurting kids, our seniors and that we can make responsible cuts that do not put our national security at risk. and not add to the heavy tax burden of hardworking americans that they're already carrying. it was a shame that the president and the senate have avoided working with the house in real budgeting process. i look forward to working with all my colleagues on resupporting -- restoring faith to the american people and bringing order back to this process. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back the balance of my time. mr. westmoreland: i t
, and we must thank the city of savannah department of cultural affairs, festival upon spores, members, and individual donors for their support. it is because of them that we are able to bring you these esteemed authors for free. if you enjoyed today's speakers and would like to make a donation to the festival, we've provided yellow buckets at the door when you exit. please consider giving to our bucket list for next year's gifted scribes. before we get started, i just have a couple of housekeeping notes for you. please take a moment to silence your cell phones. i had to do that myself. okay. immediately following his presentation, mr. gore will be signing copies of his book. please go to the fellowship hall which is located directly behind the pulpit, and you go out the doors and around, and a right turn as you enter the exit the sanctuary. there's volunteers outside to direct you. mr. gore will be able to sign 400 books, and you must have the numbered card that was included with your book purchase. your signing order will correspond with your card number, and you will be called in gr
's office, attorney general eric holder, to just in my city alone, the city of houston, to report 15 voter abuse cases. without the preclearance where would we be? or the proposal to eliminate the independent school district board of trustees, over a school district that has worked hard to survive, will be subjected to the preclearance to determine whether not only the students will be denied their right to learn in a school district they love and is fighting for their education, but that elected persons will be denied the right to serve and others denied the right to vote for them. the voting rights act protects all voters. it gives them all the right to vote, one vote one person. shelby county has raised the issue they should not be subjected to preclearance. they are beyond that. the district court, federal court decided in washington, d.c., that they were wrong. that preclearance is constitutional. and we know that well because about -- because when we had the privilege of re-authorizing section 5 in 2006, building on the leadership of my predecessor, the honorable barbara jordan, who
and producing in ge-sun city work -- ge- sensitive markets. we will look at monitoring, maintaining the. t of publicly held germ classes, because there is concern about that. -- the purity of publicly-held germ classes, because there is concern about that. as will mitigate the risk associated when folks want to do things a little bit differently, in the same general space. it is part of managing risk. the long-term risk we will face, with a changing climate -- i will conclude with this. there is no question that the climate is changing. we recently furnished to assessments from usda on the impact of changing climates on agriculture and forestry. the conclusions were pretty obvious. higher temperatures lead to more intense weather patterns. more intense weather patterns lead to greater stress for crops and livestock. and increase tree mortality. we at usda have a responsibility to figure out ways in which we can mitigate the risks of something we really cannot control. when it happens, we cannot control when a drought occurs. we cannot control when a horrible tornado hits, or when flooding
from new york city mayor michael bloomberg's advocacy group. mayors against illegal guns. >> we think it's reasonable to provide mandatory, instant background checks at every sale at every gun show no loopholes anywhere for anyone. >> america can do it for us. >> that's come from bloomberg's group, mayors against illegal guns which purchased air time only in washington, d.c. to run that ad last night during the super bowl. it showed wayne lapiere testifying in 1999. they did support background checks in 1990s but now are against that policy. it could be the only new legislation with a hope of making it through congress even some prominent republicans are coming around to support that one but many lawmakers, including some democrats still are against a renewed assault weapons band or restrictions on high capacity magazine clips. some other news from d.c. john kerry getting started as secretary of state in his first weekend on the job, he spoke with both israeli and palestinian leaders about peace in the mid east and with turkey about friday's terr
costing them a lot of money. in new york, it is more about the city of new york than the state of new york. the smoking bans which did not help -- did not hurt businesses. when everybody knew the rules, all the bad restaurants shifted over. -- all the restaurants shifted over. this allows a more sophisticated way of dealing with the socialized costs so will we can share them more easily. if you create rules that everyone can follow, they will all do the right thing. otherwise, people will cherry pick and profits accordingly. i personally think each state will have to find their own way of going on this path. it is worth putting this in a document. asked mike bloomberg if this is good or bad. if we're talking about the impact of sodas comment that was worth the risk politically to get that conversation going. there are many other states. fantastic improvement in some of the major urban areas like philadelphia. when you look at this places, they are simple things done well. real food, social infrastructure, mich.-as its 4x4 tool. what little to do all of view, it ought to be about second opi
. if somebody applied in the, to the mexico city u.s. embassy in january of 2007, and someone else crossed the border and is here in january of 2008, we all agree that the person who waited in line in 2007 should be able to get that green card before the person in 2008. we have to figure out how to do that so it's not an interminalably long period of time, that people are old or dead before they become. at the same time we have to make sure that this principle is kept because that helps us pass a bill. one other point i would make. we made two exceptions to that. dick durbin worked very hard on the dream act. we all agreed that should get special priority. >> young people born here as children? >> yeah. second we'll need something special for agriculture because it is a different situation. virtually whether you're in new york dairy country or arizona ranching country you can't get americans to do this kind of work. >> we're about to get the hook. my penultimate question, senator mccain, have you talked to speaker boehner about this? >> no but i did hear this statement a couple days ago wh
of the largest cities and in some smaller independent operators in smaller cities. a good part of the traffic has been people who stream it online, and that is a pretty dedicated following. in fact, with the very large online content, a good percentage of that comes from the united states. there is an appetite, clearly. how much of that will translate to a cable channel again where some of these folks are dedicated online streamers' is a challenge, but we hope we can provide interesting and freshen up content and have some people cross over. host: how will the recent purchase expand the american audience? who will you be able to reach now? >> -- guest: it is an estimated 50 million viewers. obviously it is a great leap forward and a great deal. one of the things we fought for years was distribution in the americas. this just opens some eyeballs to us, and we hope it will give people a chance to see our coverage, to sample it for those who have not seen it, and again, provide a platform for the core audience we already have. host: it is a 24-hour global news network carried in places like new york
the curvature of the earth and hitting new york city on this video with that very odd background music playing. but it just shows an attitude, and i think that we cannot stand idle and tell ourselves that further sanctions have no prospect of success, especially when we saw how effective for that brief period of time where the treasury department was so concerned about the counterfeiting of $100 bills that they actually forced deployment of those financial sanctions on those institutions which the north koreans used in order to have access to hard currency. we saw at that time the result and the protests from north korea, and the result inside north korea when there was not the money to pay the military or carry out the types of programs that they do in terms of their missile and nuclear testing. so it's time to be honest with the american people that frankly our current north korean policy is not working. it hasn't worked for a long time. going forward, we need to move away from that failed north korean policy to one with energy and creativity and focus, and i think we need to learn from what
threat towards seoul, north korean, artillery pieces and rocket launchers that can destroy the city of seoul in a matter of minutes or a few hours, if the north koreans unleash this weaponry. and they have this kind of deterrence. to threaten us and they have had it for a long period of time and we are very, very cognizant about this. another related issue in this connection though is that once north korea mounts nuclear warheads on its missiles, how is, how is that going to affect the retaliation policy? that was established between the united states and south korea in 2010, following the shelling of the young pong island in november of 2010. policy that in the future south korea would have the right to retaliate militarily, if north korea committed future provocations and the u.s. would support that kind of retaliation. what is going to happen to the u.s. and the rok attitude towards the retaliation policy once north korea has nuclear war ahead on its missiles and can threaten to rain nuclear missiles down on south korea, if south korea does retaliate? how are we going to react to
interests in the city. i'd like to have you go ahead and put that chart up. and leave it up during the course of this hearing because each member up heres a a copy of this. there are certain things that happened we all know. we know on may 22 the red cross was hit with an r.p.g. they left town. we know on june 11, the british ambassador's motorcade was attacked by an r.p.g. they left town. we know on april 10 the united states convoy was hit by an i.e.d. and on june 6, the u.s. consulate was attacked with a bomb and many, many other things. but we stayed. we didn't leave. while i understand the state department has primary responsibility for the protection of american diplomats around the world, i also understand that the defense department plays an important role -- supporting role to this effect. i expect our witnesses to explain today why, given the clear indication -- indicators tanned warnings, threats to the united states interests in benghazi and throughout the north africa were growing was the -- was the defense department not placed on a heightened alert status or adequate
can change that cities good ideas can be heard? >> congressman, it comes down to at the ministry of and congressional demand that the mission itself would be effectively carried out. then there has to be a focus and oversight the best way to do that and whether the department of homeland security is implementing it so the extent that if they go back to the suspects in the defense committee the question is are there better ideas that can infect the incorporated command can refine the methodology to do that other than the general contractor type of approach? as we know, the typical approach of the government particularly the dhs is too high year a big player and the innovative small business people that you're talking about simply become players as subcontractors to read the question is can we find a way to make sure that we are fully engaged in the most innovative small business people as they come up with new and innovative ideas and that is an administrative approach within the congress can rightly demand. >> we now recognize you for a question. >> spending tax dollars wisely li
's from huffington post. to bonnie, let's go to our republican line next, to nicholas in new york city. nicholas, welcome. >> caller: well, it's great to be here, and thank you, and i'll try to make it brief, and let me apologize to the others waiting on line. i just, very quickly, you know, i came here as a child in 1966, and they moved us up to the bronx. we came here through red cross auspices. and, you know, my dad and mom worked two and three jobs, eventually they bought real estate because they saved their money. we were subsistence farmers back home -- >> host: nicholas, where -- where was back home? you said you came here in '66. where was back home? >> caller: montenegro today on border of albanian on the coast of adriatic sea. we were albanian catholics. in fact, we were a minority amongst other minorities, but we were the minority. >> host: back to our question, how do you think these budget cuts will affect you? >> guest: well, i've been watching this thing, and it seems like i've seen this movie before. now, i've worked very hard as my mom and daddied, as my brothers do, a
as shopping reminders of the especial -- epidemic in cities. this unspeakable tragedy is affected by countless tragedys that take place in our streets that pass too often unnoticed and that too frequently decimate the lives of our most vulnerable sit zernings our children. every loss is shearting. and inexplicable, yet each one is an outrage. this is why it has affected citizen, hard broken parents and advocates that we are sworn to protect. it's time for each of us to steal our reserve and renew our commitment to respond to this senseless violence with renewed individual lens. we are determined to work with organizations like this one to build a bipartisan consensus for taking decisive action to end begun violence. and we will not rest until we've done everything in our power to prevent future tragedies like the one that took place at sandy hook elementary school. now, of course, there will never be a simple, one size fits all solution for addressing any challenge of this magnitude and confronting all of its underlying causes but we must not allow the size or the complexity of this problem to
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)